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 Post Posted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 7:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:59 am
Posts: 384
Location: Sunshine Coast, Qld
Below are a few handy hints on kit car and general car prep and building techniques. I am not the guru and learn something new everyday so please feel free to chime in and add your own ideas, suggestions etc.

I may not be a guru of car assembly but I do have some pet hates so maybe we should kick of with those.

1) Don't put parts covered in grease, oil, filth, old chain lube etc on the car - ever! This is one I just don't get as you could be easily fitting parts that have faults and you will never know as these issues are covered up in crap. Not to mention I hate touching a fresh build and getting filthy and then potentially transferring dirty mit prints to the rest of the car. Kero, $1.99 cans of degreaser, soap and water, whatever you choice (even my old mans preferred degreaser and hand cleaner - Super petrol, "not standard, its not as good...", although it's a fairly explosive choice and of course 98 would be the new world replacement for Super) there is no excuse. If you don't have a fancy parts washer, just obtain a largish plastic tray, sit the parts in it and hit it with the spray can degreaser and stiff brush. Hose off and preferably blow off with compressed air.

2) Dodgy wiring. If you have never seen how easily an electrical fire starts I highly recommend putting a thin piece of wire across the terminals of a car battery. Its very impressive. Instant burning insulation and if anything flammable is around you will have a major problem on your hands. As the vast majority of circuits will be fused perhaps the biggest issues will be the wiring between the fuse block and battery and most importantly the battery cable between starter solenoid and battery.

Suggestions for wiring techniques coming soon.

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 Post Posted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 9:10 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 12:56 pm
Posts: 78
Hi builders
I agree with Andrew in my years of racing I have seen some terrible things, putting peoples lives at risk, my attitude was you win races from home. to finish first / first you have to finish. take your time, work in a clean environment, clean and check all parts (including new) I use automotive prep clean. when starting each part of the project make sure you have all of the correct materials and tools, biggest problems I use to see was people taking covers off the motor (rocker cover
clutch/water pump etc) and not replacing the gasket, I use Threebond liquid gasket 1207b (black)
and you patter it on, never had a leak. stripping of bolts, not all bolts need to be done up by a muscle man/women. I'm no expert there is never a silly question but doing it properly NOW will save you headaches and sitting on the side of the road. I purchased the tripod to have fun and put a smile on my face.
I hope this helps


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 Post Posted: Wed Nov 04, 2015 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:59 am
Posts: 384
Location: Sunshine Coast, Qld
Thanks Michael for chiming in. In fact I would love this thread to be a wealth of information from everybody as to there handy hints and techniques.

No one knows it all but between us I'm sure we put together a thread with enough info in it that the beginner who's having a crack at screwing together a car can use it as a handy guide for where to start.

To continue on where I left off this morning.

If your battery cable shorts out to the chassis in any kind of permanent way your car is burning to the waterline. No ifs or buts. Hopefully it wont set your house or shed on fire while its at it but it probably will... This is serious stuff folks!!

Double insulate the 12v battery cable and insulate the terminals appropriately. Make sure the battery is properly clamped down in its tray. The extra insulation can be convoluted cable wrapping or maybe spiral wrap. Clamp it down here and there to make sure its not sliding around and potentially wearing through the insulation. Grommet holes in firewalls etc and then use extra insulation at those points so its effectively triple insulated. Sounds like a lot of trouble. Not really and the alternative is unacceptable. Properly mount your solenoid so its not rolling around and potentially damaging insulation or fatiguing the cables screwed down to it.

Never over rate fuses. Never replace a 10A fuse with a 20A or a 30A for testing purposes unless you know what you are doing. Never go "okay the 20A doesn't blow but the 10A does, I'll leave the 20A in as that has fixed the problem"!

Don't cable tie wiring loom sections to the chassis tubes super tight. Don't tie cables to the chassis that don't have outer wrap or insulation.

3) Speaking of cable ties. Cut them off flush and turn there clip section inward or to a point where you won't cut your hand when brushing past it.

4) This is a doozy and am pretty sure no one that has anything to do with Tri Pods would attempt it, but a forum I read with normally quite intelligent folk on it had a thread recently about a guy buying a donor engine out of a wreck, fitting it to his car and then heading off to a track day. Sounds fine you say, yeas it is but he left the oil that was in the wrecked engine in it! Not sure if he really even checked the level?? The result of the track day was that it did three laps and destroyed itself.

I only ever use the original oil that came in the donor engine for a 10 second run up to establish that it starts and runs, and that is after checking the level. After that it gets dumped as does the filter and replaced with appropriate oil. In most cases I would change the oil again pretty quickly and possibly the filter. Depends how many kms on the donk. If its high kms I would be changing it again after one decent drive (200 - 300 kms). High kays on a bike engine is 50,000 plus (well thats enough for me to warrant and extra oil change, its really that higher kms). Not that the engine will be the slightest bit worn but the oil may well be very old. A decent high temp run may well un glug old crap and sludge that needs to be dumped promptly. Of course there may well be some wear in the engine if the oil has not been changed for a very very long time. The overall condition of the bike will generally be the clue. A well maintained tidy bike (crashed or not) will generally indicate they were fussy with oil changes too (but not always).

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 Post Posted: Sun Nov 08, 2015 2:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 3:25 pm
Posts: 84
Location: Leschenault Western Australia
Ah Andrew,
My wife reckons I'm obsessive compulsive about cleanliness when I work on my bikes. Its good to find someone else who shares that trait :D
As to wiring looms, the only risk I face is making the car too heavy by using excessive guage wiring.
I have spent a couple of days cleaning parts in preparation.
A couple of pic's as an example.


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 Post Posted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:47 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 12:56 pm
Posts: 78
Hi Mal
Impressive, have you taken off the injector bodies and looked into the intake ports to see how much carbon
build up there is on the valve stems and seats ? you might be surprised ! if there is build up do you know how to clean them ?
I looked at mine and they were dirty, now is a good time to check valve clearances. I will be doing all of that when I get mine back from Andrew
also replacing the clutch fibres and springs. now is for peace of mind and also knowing what is in there. alot easier on the bench then in the car
not sure about upgrading stator and rectifier yet. (before install)

Michael


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 Post Posted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 5:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 27, 2012 11:59 am
Posts: 384
Location: Sunshine Coast, Qld
Looks very clean Mal!! Impressive!

I'm with Michael to on the valve clearances etc.

A lowish k engine (say under 30 odd k) should be okay both re clutch and clearances but the clearances should be checked and re shimmed if necessary. So easy to do when the engine is out. Clutch is the same but not easy to know whether its going to be okay unless its really bad.

Some Tri Pod versions need the engine out to get the clutch cover off so if you are feeling unlucky get an EBC or similar HD clutch kit and fit it now.

For me I'll take the risk because I'm always interested how long a standard clutch will last and its not that big a deal to drop the donk out of our three wheeler.

Keep the info coming Mal and Michael and others!

Regards, Andrew.

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 Post Posted: Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 3:25 pm
Posts: 84
Location: Leschenault Western Australia
Hmmm... yeah, your right, now is a good time to check the valve clearances and the throttle bodies. Gives me something to do, to stop staring wistfully at the gap in the floor where the frame is going to go :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I'm with Andrew though on the clutch. Ive found in the past that its surprising just how much punishment they can take before giving up the ghost (unless the P.O. was a wheelie merchant). I think I will risk it and accept that I will have to drop the motor if I get it wrong.

Mal


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